The 1st Issue published on February 28, 2021.   A Cell Press partner journal
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í˝ Touristú║Duke   [7-16]
I like this "FLOWER".
í˝ Touristú║Yimin Yang   [6-15]
Carbon dots have been also detected in carbonized human hairs or medical plants of traditional Chinese medicine. The physicians have confirmed that these carbon dots at least help stop bleeding.
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 Position: Home > issue > The 1st Issue (May 21, 2020)
Endogenous Fluorescence Carbon Dots Derived from Food Items
Category: Review
Author: Haitao Wang, Wentao Su, Mingqian Tan


Graphical Abstract

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Public Summary


í˝ Endogenous fluorescence carbon dots (CDs) derived from food items are ultrasmall nanoparticles with sizes below 10 nm, which typically contain carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and/or nitrogen. The most significant features of CDs are strong and tunable fluorescence.

í˝ Currently, the universal presence of CDs in food items has been proved. The formation of these endogenous food-borne CDs could be attributed to the complex reaction among a variety of food mponents during cooking process.

í˝ The contact of these endogenous food-borne CDs is very frequent in our daily life. Therefore, our knowledge about the CDs is still in its infancy and more attention should be paid to the food-borne CDs owing to their uncertainty to human health.

í˝ Primary results demonstrated that these food-borne CDs could accumulate in various organs and induce potential effects of the health. However, the concern of the long-term safety of food-borne CDs has not been addressed. Further research efforts should be focused on the chronic effects of these endogenous food-borne CDs.


Cite this article

Wang, H., Su, W. and Tan, M. Endogenous Fluorescence Carbon Dots Derived from Food Items. The Innovation 1 (1), 100009 (2020). doi: 10.1016/j.xinn.2020.04.009


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