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A whole-cell hydrogen peroxide biosensor and its application in visual food analysis

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    1. A whole-cell bacterial H2O2 biosensor was constructed.

      The luminescence signal of the biosensor responsed well to different concentration of H2O2.

      With this biosensor, the H2O2 in solid food or milk can be detected.

  • Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is broadly used in the food industry for bleaching, sterilization, and deodorization. Detection of H2O2 in food/drinks is important for food safety. In this study, the H2O2-inducible whole-cell biosensor KT2440 [pPahpC] was constructed based on the bacterial strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440. The H2O2-inducible promoter PahpC was fused with the reporter gene cluster luxCDABE to produce an H2O2-inducible bioluminescent biosensor. KT2440 [pPahpC] semi-quantitatively detected H2O2 in the range of 10 - 2000 µM. This H2O2 biosensor exhibited high specificity and no response to other commonly used redox agents, such as KMnO4, Ca(ClO)2, and thiourea. This KT2440 [pPahpC] biosensor was used to detect H2O2 in food samples, demonstrating its robust performance. The whole-cell biosensor provides a new approach to the detection of H2O2 in the food industry.
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  • Cite this article:

    Gao Y.-Z., Wang Y., Ji M., et al., (2023). A whole-cell hydrogen peroxide biosensor and its application in visual food analysis. The Innovation Life 1(1), 100011. https://doi.org/10.59717/j.xinn-life.2023.100011
    Gao Y.-Z., Wang Y., Ji M., et al., (2023). A whole-cell hydrogen peroxide biosensor and its application in visual food analysis. The Innovation Life 1(1), 100011. https://doi.org/10.59717/j.xinn-life.2023.100011

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