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Targeting and surveillance mechanisms for tail-anchored proteins

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    1. Targeting specificity of tail-anchored (TA) proteins is important for their functions.

      Targeting and surveillance mechanisms maintain organelle specificity of TA proteins.

      MSP1 clears mis-targeted TA proteins from mitochondria.

      ATP13A1/CATP-8 extracts mis-targeted TA proteins from endoplasmic reticulum.

  • Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are single-pass transmembrane proteins, which contain cytosolic domains and a C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) anchored to organelle membranes, leaving a short tail within the lumen of organelles. Organelle specific insertion pathways exist to establish TA proteins targeting specificity. Additionally, surveillance mechanisms contribute to targeting specificity by clearing mis-targeted TA proteins. Cytosolic quality control pathways clearmis-targeted TA proteins from cytosol. MSP1 and ATP13A1/CATP-8/Spf1 extract mis-targeted TA proteins from mitochondria and ER, respectively. Here, we review the progress on the targeting and clearance mechanisms of TA proteins with a focus on ER and mitochondria proteins.
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  • Cite this article:

    Qin Q., Shen K., and Wang X. (2023). Targeting and surveillance mechanisms for tail-anchored proteins. The Innovation Life 1(1), 100013. https://doi.org/10.59717/j.xinn-life.2023.100013
    Qin Q., Shen K., and Wang X. (2023). Targeting and surveillance mechanisms for tail-anchored proteins. The Innovation Life 1(1), 100013. https://doi.org/10.59717/j.xinn-life.2023.100013

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